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WW2 SPECIAL AIR SERVICE [SAS] QUALIFICATION BADGE
Very nice and rare wartime padded SAS wing. Three popper fixings to reverse. Used and worn condition.

The wing shape is said to be based on the ancient hieroglyph for Ra, the Egyptian solar deity, seen on a frieze in a Cairo hotel by Jock Lewes, designer of the badge. The light and dark blue colours were in the original hieroglyph but had an additional significance as Lewes had rowed for Oxford and another founder member of the unit, Lt. Langton, had rowed for Cambridge. The badge was worn at the top of the right arm by all qualified parachutists of the Regiment but on the left breast above any medals by anyone who had made an operational drop or participated in a conspicuous operation.

Reference Imperial War Museum
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/30060254

Code: 53858Price:


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50th/51st/52nd COMMANDO CAP BADGE [Middle East Campaign]
A fine scarce brass cap badge with two thin loops with spiralled shanks. Correct for badge. Formed in 1940. Included Jewish and Palestinian troops from the Auxiliary Military Pioneer Corps. Worn with or without parent cap badge, 40mm long. Reference Taylor p67-68

Code: 53845Price: 140.00 GBP


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WW2 PARACHUTE REGT QUALIFICATION ARM BADGE
A fine woven example. 86 mm wide 34 mm heigh

Code: 53837Price: 80.00 GBP


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WW2 FREE FRENCH 3rd SAS BERET BADGE
A fine scarce French Special Forces, trimmed example.

Code: 53830Price: 320.00 GBP


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WW2 FREE FRENCH SAS PARACHUTE REGIMENT BERET BADGE
A fine worn in late 1943/1944 very rare bi metal beret badge. Cross of Lorraine soldered to a Parachute Regiment Beret badge which has the Kings Crown removed. Although crudely soldered, this would have been the correct way. Most Iíve seen look like they have been superglued, with no other means of fixing.

The French used to say that it was the British insignia without the "chien-chien et son panier", which means "the little dog and his basket".
This is a very scarce item.
Reference Allied Special Forces Insignia 1939-1948 by Peter Taylor page 136 (shows a badge minus crown and cross of Lorraine)



Code: 53829Price: On Request


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WW2 PARACHUTE REGIMENT CAR BADGE
An excellent WW2 Regimental enamel car badge, with JR Gaunt maker. 140mm high

Code: 53823Price: On Request


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WW2 PARACHUTE REGIMENT QUALIFICATION BADGES
Two fine trimmed early UK made parachute lightbulb qualification badge. One Officers Bullion and an other ranks qualification lightbulb badges. Both 40 mm high aprox.

Code: 53816Price: 110.00 GBP


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WW2 1st PATTERN PARACHUTE REGIMENT VOIDED CROWN CAP BADGE
A fine scarce WW2 white metal die struck Parachute Regiment cap badge with voided king 's crown and lion 's legs.
Indicating an early first issue type cap badge, with two original fixing loops the reverse.

Code: 53803Price: 160.00 GBP


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WW2 SPECIAL AIR SERVICE [SAS] BERET BADGE
A fine scarce woven WW2 beret badge.

The Special Air Service began life in July 1941 from an unorthodox idea and plan by a Lieutenant in the Scots Guards David Stirling, who was serving with No. 8 (Guards) Commando. His idea was for small teams of parachute trained soldiers to operate behind enemy lines to gain intelligence, destroy enemy aircraft and attack their supply and reinforcement routes.

Code: 53794Price:


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LONG RANGE DESERT GROUP WW2 BERET BADGE
A very scarce Long Range Desert Group beret badge, die cast with two loops to reverse. A little rubbed, but you can still see slight definition in the Scorpions back, an excellent original item. Lots of fakes about as we all know, came from a good source. More photos if required. Just email me, or I can send photos.

The Long Range Desert Group (LRDG) was a reconnaissance and raiding unit of the British Army during the Second World War. The commander of the German Afrika Corps, Field Marshal Erwin Rommel, admitted that the LRDG "caused us more damage than any other British unit of equal strength".
Originally called the Long Range Patrol (LRP), the unit was founded in Egypt in June 1940 by Major Ralph A. Bagnold, acting under the direction of General Archibald Wavell. Bagnold was assisted by Captain Patrick Clayton and Captain William Shaw. At first the majority of the men were from New Zealand, but they were soon joined by Rhodesian and British volunteers, whereupon new sub-units were formed and the name was changed to the better-known Long Range Desert Group (LRDG). The LRDG never numbered more than 350 men, all of whom were volunteers.
The LRDG was formed specifically to carry out deep penetration, covert reconnaissance patrols and intelligence missions from behind Italian lines, although they sometimes engaged in combat operations. Because the LRDG were experts in desert navigation they were sometimes assigned to guide other units, including the Special Air Service and secret agents across the desert. During the Desert Campaign between December 1940 and April 1943, the vehicles of the LRDG operated constantly behind the Axis lines, missing a total of only 15 days during the entire period. Possibly their most notable offensive action was during Operation Caravan, an attack on the town of Barce and its associated airfield, on the night of 13 September 1942. However, their most vital role was the 'Road Watch', during which they clandestinely monitored traffic on the main road from Tripoli to Benghazi, transmitting the intelligence to British Army Headquarters.
With the surrender of the Axis forces in Tunisia in May 1943, the LRDG changed roles and moved operations to the eastern Mediterranean, carrying out missions in the Greek islands, Italy and the Balkans. After the end of the war in Europe, the leaders of the LRDG made a request to the War Office for the unit to be transferred to the Far East to conduct operations against the Japanese Empire. The request was declined and the LRDG was disbanded in August 1945.

Code: 53778Price: 800.00 GBP

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