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WW2 HOME GUARD CAMBRIDGESHIRE FORMATION SHOULDER TITLE

WW2 HOME GUARD CAMBRIDGESHIRE FORMATION SHOULDER TITLE

A fine Cambridgeshire unit 1st Battalion.

Code: 54745

42.00 GBP


WW2 46th INFANTRY DIVISION FORMATION SIGN.

WW2 46th INFANTRY DIVISION FORMATION SIGN.

A fine printed formation sign.

Code: 54737

17.00 GBP


WW2 SCOTTISH COMMAND FORMATION SIGN

WW2 SCOTTISH COMMAND FORMATION SIGN

A fine woven formation sign.

Code: 54735

17.00 GBP


WW2 CYRENAICA DISTRICT FORMATION SIGN.

WW2 CYRENAICA DISTRICT FORMATION SIGN.

A fine printed formation sign

Code: 54739

27.00 GBP


WW2 73rd INDEPENDENT INFANTRY BRIGADE FORMATION SIGN

WW2 73rd INDEPENDENT INFANTRY BRIGADE FORMATION SIGN

Printed example.

A black shield (edged in gold) bearing fifteen gold bezants (small circles) superimposed on a vertically positioned white sword with gold hilt, point down, all on a blue ground.

The design was that of the arms of the Duchy of Cornwall, the sword representing Excalibur to mark the traditional association of King Arthur with the West Country. Divisional HQ was formed 28 February 1941 from personnel of HQ South West Area or Southern Command. Re-designated 77th Infantry Division 1 December 1941. The badge was adopted by the 73rd Independent Infantry Brigade (qv) when the County Division was redesignated 77th Infantry Division on 1 December 1941. (77th Division also had Excalibur in its badge
Reference ; https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/30072501

Code: 54736

SOLD


WW2 53rd WELSH DIVISION FORMATION SIGN

WW2 53rd WELSH DIVISION FORMATION SIGN

A fine printed formation sign, unused.

Code: 54738

27.00 GBP


WW2 4th INDIAN DIVISION FORMATION SIGNS

WW2 4th INDIAN DIVISION FORMATION SIGNS

A matching facing pair of printed signs. Red eagle printed on a rectangular black cloth background

The Division was nicknamed the 'Red Eagles' as a consequence of the distinctive emblem of the bird of prey on its badge. The first badges worn in North Africa were given by the women of the Punjab.

The formation fought in the Western Desert Force at Sidi Barrani. It was then withdrawn to East Africa, where, together with 5th Indian Division, was instrumental in the defeat of the Italians at Keren. The Division returned to North Africa without 5th Indian Brigade which took part in operations against the Vichy French forces in Syria. The whole Division took part in Operation 'Crusader' in November 1941. In April 1942, the Division was withdrawn from the desert, one brigade going to Cyprus, one to Palestine and the third to the Canal Zone. The Division was later reformed and took part in the early stages of El Alamein, but in November was withdrawn from offensive operations to do battlefield salvage. The Division was in action again at the Mareth Line and fought at Wadi Akarit. It then joined 1st Army (First Army) for the remainder of the campaign in North Africa. The formation disembarked at Taranto on 8 December 1943 and in spring 1944 took part in the fighting at Cassino. The Division was the first to break the Gothic Line in August. It was then transferred to Greece for 'aid to civil power' duties until return to India in early 1946.

Reference
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/30076415

Code: 54731

55.00 GBP


WW2 13th INFANTRY DIVISION FORMATION SIGN

WW2 13th INFANTRY DIVISION FORMATION SIGN

Printed example of the black horse-shoe on a red square that has been affixed to a pale k.d. tropical, with four popper fixings. Reference Cole page 39.

The badge is said to have been chosen to offset any bad luck associated with the number 13. The badge is the same as that used by 13th (Western) Division in WWI.
The Division was raised in the winter of 1945 during WW2 in Greece and was formed on the British elements of 4th Indian Division. The infantry units were formed largely from artillery units. Although there was no CRA or HQRA all three brigadiers were gunners. It is not known when the formation was disbanded but it does not appear in Cole's book of 1949 or in Bellis 12. It was probably primarily intended as a holding formation for demobilisation purposes so it would have had a very short life. The same design was intended as the third pattern badge for the 39th Independent Infantry Brigade, but with a green background, but was apparently never worn.

Code: 54732

22.00 GBP


WW2 59th STAFFORDSHIRE REGIMENT FORMATION SIGN.

WW2 59th STAFFORDSHIRE REGIMENT FORMATION SIGN.

A fine woven formation sign.
Reference ; https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/59th_(Staffordshire)_Infantry_Division

Code: 54734

SOLD


WW2 ANTI AIRCRAFT COMMAND FORMATION SIGN

WW2 ANTI AIRCRAFT COMMAND FORMATION SIGN

A printed black bow and arrow pointed upwards, above a 'torse', all on a red ground. The design includes the 'recurved' bow, arm to the left, right hand closed, and with the 'torse' a continuous wavy line.

This is the second pattern badge, the first being a simple bow. This second pattern badge was adopted after October 1942 when the AA Corps and Divisional structure was abolished. The two patterns of badge appear to have existed side by side for the remainder of the war and into the post-war period. The sign was symbolic of defence against air attack. Its choice was influenced by the fact that a similar sign appeared on the facade of 'Glenthorn', the house at Stanmore chosen as Anti-Aircraft Command's HQ. The house was in turn chosen because it lay with a few hundred yards from, and in the grounds of, Bentley Priory, HQ of Fighter Command. The sign was taken from the crest of the Gordon family who built Glenthorn in the previous century. The sign was also similar to the naked kneeling archer that was the badge of the first School of AA Defence at Biggin Hill. Initially the sign was worn only by AA Command staff. When the AA Corps and Divisions were disbanded in October 1942 the new AA Groups did not take up distinctive signs of their own and all AA Groups and units wore the AA Command sign. The transition was complete by the end of December 1942. There are many variations of the badge, with different patterns of hands and variations on how the torse was depicted. There are also versions where the arm is on the right, which has led to suggestions that in some cases the badge could have been worn as facing pairs. However, as this appears to be heraldically incorrect, this and the other variations are more generally considered to be merely manufacturers' errors or variations. In the period between the two World Wars anti-aircraft (AA) defence was the responsibility of the RAF, specifically Fighter Command through the agency of the Air Defence of Great Britain (ADGB) organization, created in 1925. 1st AA Division was created in December 1935 to guard London and the Home Counties, 2nd AA Division being formed in December 1936 to guard the Midlands. In June 1938 1st AA Corps was created to command five AA Divisions, at this stage largely paper formations. Anti-Aircraft Command was formed in January 1939 and in April of that year two further AA Corps and seven AA Divisions, with 24 AA Brigades, were created, all of which were to be established by September 1939. In November 1940 the AA Corps took over operational command of the AA Divisions from AA Command. In October 1942 all three AA Corps and all twelve AA Divisions were disbanded, the constituent units being reorganized under seven AA Groups.

Code: 54733

17.00 GBP